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Health Clinic

My name is Kimberly Plante.  I am a Registered Nurse and have spent the last 17 years in the hospital setting specializing in Emergency and Cardiac Care.  It was my passion for wellness and prevention that motivated me to pursue my masters in Health Education and School Nurse Teacher Certification.  After spending just one week here with the children, I find myself hooked.  I’m really enjoying caring for them. 

Please feel free to contact me anytime and I look forward to meeting my new families.

Kimberly Plante, RN,BSN,SNT
kplante@westerly.k12.ri.us
401-348-2306

Announcements
Warm Weather Safety
*Sunscreen Application at School

Summer weather is upon us. It’s also the time of year for sunscreen application prior to any sun exposure. Sunscreen is considered an over the counter medication that would require a doctor’s order for application at school. If you feel your child’s activities require sunscreen, please apply prior to the start of the school day. Many upcoming activities are planned for outdoors. For clarification, please contact your school nurse teacher.

*Also, please remember to take precautions for insect and tick bites. I recommend a body check at night for ticks and to treat all bug bites to prevent infection.



Be Sun Smart
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/summer-umbrellas-2993691.jpg

As the hot days approach we should think about Sun Smarts: Too much sun and high temperatures can be unhealthy. We should all be able to enjoy our favorite summer fun activities if we just follow some simple tips.
  • Seek shade. UV rays are strongest and most harmful during midday, so it's best to plan indoor activities then. If this is not possible, seek shade under a tree, an umbrella, or a pop-up tent. Use these options to prevent sunburn, not to seek relief after it's happened.
  • Cover up. Clothing that covers your child's skin helps protect against UV rays. Although a long-sleeved shirt and long pants with a tight weave are best, they aren't always practical. A T-shirt, long shorts, or a beach cover-up are good choices, too.
  • Get a hat. Hats that shade the face, scalp, ears, and neck are easy to use and give great protection. Baseball caps are popular among kids, but they don't protect their ears and neck. If your child chooses a cap, be sure to protect exposed areas with sunscreen.
  • Carry a water bottle to prevent dehydration Children are at higher risk of dehydration because their bodies use more water.
  • Apply sunscreen. Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and UVA and UVB protection every time your child goes outside and reapply after your child swims or exercises. Please remember to apply sunscreen to your child before school as we will be enjoying more outdoor activities.

    As the year closes, we will continue to cover safety in health classes.
    Enjoy a safe, healthy and happy summer!
    Kimberly Plante,
    School Nurse Teacher

Health Fair
“TWO GREAT EVENTS ON ONE NIGHT”
ATTACK THE TRACK & COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR

WESTERLY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GRADES K-5
Attack the Track Family Fun Night
WHS Culinary Arts “Highland Grille” Prepared Food Available
&
Community Health Fair
Westerly High School Track
Wednesday May 17th from 5:30-7:00 pm - Rain Date May 18th
All Events Kindergarten-Grade 5 50m Dash, 100m Dash, 200m Dash and 400m Dash
Long Jump and Softball Toss

*Children can participate in any events.
PARENTS MUST STAY TO SUPERVISE CHILDREN.
***MORE DETAILS ON BACK PAGE
WESTERLY SCHOOL NURSES
PRESENT
“A COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR”
Come visit our participating vendors

American Cancer Society Arrowhead Dental

Department of Transportation Healthy Bodies, Healthy Minds

Journey to Hope, Health & Healing McQuades Pharmacy

Rhode Island Blood Center South County Hospital
URI Tick Disease Prevention Westerly Ambulance Corps

Westerly Police
PICK UP YOUR PASSPORT
Visit Vendors
GET PASSPORT STAMPED AT EACH VENDOR
TO BE ENTERED
INTO A RAFFLE FOR A NEW BICYCLE!
Spring Announcements
Image result for pics of kids playing outside
Hello Springbrook families:
Spring is here and so is the nice weather. Students are becoming more active outside, therefore, it is important to dress in layers and wear the proper footwear to avoid injuries.
We continue to cover safety in health classes, with the warmer weather, we will focus on outdoor/water/sun safety. Areas of focus are bicycle/helmet safety, staying safe on playgrounds and around strangers, staying hydrated and free of sunburn in the heat. Please see the following link on kidshealth.org for fun ways for families to stay safe. http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/center/summer-center.html?ref=searchis focusing on Emotional Health and Safety
Please feel free to ask them what they have learned and continue to reinforce. Increasing self-esteem is a great way to decrease the chances of a child making the wrong decisions.


marchpic.jpeg
Introducing: Springbrook School’s “Embracing Change” Program!

Welcome all Grade 4 Girls! Bring your Mother, Grandmother, or favorite Adult to a special night just for fourth grade girls. We will have some fun and talk about the special changes you will experience during puberty.

Join us for pizza, beverages and a special gift bag for girls.

Watch for registration flyers and return by May 4, 2017.

Where: SES Library

When: Thursday, March 11, 2017 6-7 pm.

March Announcement
Image result for pics of notes from school nurse
March is National Nutrition Month!
Here are some links to help motivate us to eat right and stay active.
“Let’s Go 5210” http://www.letsgo.org/programs/ Image result for pics of let's go 5210
5210 is a program promoting a healthy lifestyle for everyone. Please take a few minutes to view this introduction to the program.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21s8-SMOSTY#
Choose my plate Image result for my plate pics
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/

Information on Head Lice
Head lice are small insects that live on the hair and scalp of humans and feed on blood. The eggs called “nits” are white specks that look like dandruff, but cling to the hair shaft and cannot easily be dislodged or removed. Lice and Nits do not jump or fly. They usually die after being off a person for 48 hours.
Some symptoms of Head Lice include:
· Itching of the scalp which can be mild to intense.
· Redness noted behind ears or nape of neck.
Treatment:
. Do not use regular shampoo. Contact your pediatrician or pharmacist to choose an effective product.
. Follow directions on product; use fine tooth comb to remove nits. Use daylight.https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/SKRiXgUJh8vxW22FhMZPSl5HRGNnKQNmMlxsGDEUtkXtMfdRDcUBJBcDKZxp4YJ2X04CRlUrfSWrmRNX8BRRj1V17eLXPRfEAJVvRFc2X3us4P7ET3RI5Uq2knn3wNAsIm7jI6kR
. Wash bed linens, pillows, scarfs, hats, clothing and towels in hot water and dried in hot dryer.
. Use disinfectant/hot water for combs/brushes.
. Put non-washable items in a plastic bag x 10 days.
. Vacuum carpets/floors/furniture and vehicles.
Prevention:
. Check all family members, siblings, close contacts and treat as necessary.
· Lice are transmitted by direct contact with the individual or in-direct contact with clothing, furniture, sharing brushes, and combs. Bring pillow/brush to sleepovers.
· Classrooms will continue to be cleaned and maintained as usual including vacuuming of carpeted areas.
Protocol:
· No child will be excluded or allowed to miss school because of head lice/nits.
. Parent contact will be made when children have been found to have lice or nits.
. Students may remain in school and take bus home.
. Prompt proper treatment is in the best interest of the child and their classmates.
. Student may return to school after appropriate treatment.
Please call your school-nurse teacher with questions/concerns.

January Health Update
Hello Springbrook Families:
Some healthful notes from the Health Clinic:
-We are currently covering safety in health class. Topics include fire, home, stranger, bicycle, playground, and sun and water safety. Please review packets with your child and encourage discussion to reinforce information.
-January is here and so is the snow and cold. Please be sure to dress your child according to the weather. The students will be allowed to play in the snow (weather permitting) only if they have full snow gear.
-We are still promoting the 5210 Program, a holistic approach to staying healthy as a family. January is National Fiber Focus Month Oatmeal Month. Please see link to right.
“The Stomach Bug”
The stomach bug is a highly contagious virus sometimes caused by the norovirus. The infection causes gastroenteritis (inflammation of the stomach and intestines). This leads to diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain. The stomach bug is often called by other names, such as food poisoning and stomach flu. The stomach bug is not related to the flu, which is a respiratory illness caused by the influenza virus.
Acute Gastroenteritis:
. The stomach bug causes about 21 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the U.S..
. Symptoms: frequent diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration (call pediatrician).
. Several strains of the virus exist, so you can get infected and sick many times in your
life.
. You are most contagious during active diarrhea/vomiting and first 3 days recovery.
Prevention:
. Wash your hands! Best way to stop spread of infection (all kinds!).
. Keep hands away from T-Zone (mouth, nose, eyes, ears).
. Avoid direct contact, sharing food, drinks and objects used by infected person.
. Keep student home till eating/drinking to sustain them through an academic day and stools are formed (Read more: Letter from Your School Nurse Teacher).
Health Clinic Update

Newsletter –From the School Nurse

This month in health class we will be studying the topic of staying well which is important because we need to protect our immune system (helps prevent disease). In order to do this we need to go back to the basics.
  1. Get plenty of sleep. According to CDC (Center for Disease Control), Insufficient sleep has been linked to the development and management of a number of chronic diseases and conditions, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and depression.
Sleep guidelines from the CDC
Age Recommended Amount of Sleep
Newborns 16–18 hours a day
Preschool-aged children 11–12 hours a day
School-aged children At least 10 hours a day
Teens 9–10 hours a day
Adults (including the elderly) 7–8 hours a day
  1. Eat a healthy diet- Just to reinforce, we should refer to the “Choose MyPlate.gov” website to help reinforce good eating habits, such as making half our plate’s fruits and vegetables and the other half whole grains and protein. Also, to drink plenty of water and avoid sugary beverages.

3.) Exercise regularly - Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and fitness, and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. School aged children should be getting at least 60 minutes of aerobic exercise daily

  1. Preventing the spread of Germs- Washing hands is the number one preventive measure we can take to prevent spreading germs. We should also be conscious of sneezing or coughing into our elbow.
  1. Good Hygiene – Students are learning the importance of keeping their bodies and home environment clean in order to prevent illness and to increase self-esteem.

  1. Regular Visits to family physician – To include immunizations and checkups.
Healthy update
Hello:
We are currently studying Nutrition in health class. We will teach the four food groups as recommended by the government website ChooseMyPlate.gov. Please help to reinforce the importance of Energy in (the nutritious food we eat for the calories and energy we need to stay healthy) and Energy out (the activities and exercise we do to burn energy and calories).
Also, we will continue to reinforce the 5210 “Let’s Go! Program. Remember the basics:
5 = Eat 5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day
2 = Try to limit your screen time (phone, video games, TV, computer) to two or less hours a day aside from school work.
1 = Get at least 1 hour of physical activity a day
0 = Try not having any sugary beverages (drink mostly water and low-fat milk)
Try some of these fun family activities for great indoor exercise when you can’t get outside.
-Organized dance or aerobic routines (possibly videos, Wii, Xbox)
-Freeze Dance – When the music stops, freeze in your pose and hold it until the music starts again.
-Hoola Hoop
-Follow the Leader - Add to the workout by doing energetic movements like jumping jacks, stomping and squatting.
Remember to drink plenty of water.
Kimberly Plante, SNT
image
Health Clinic Update
Healthy Habits are the key to Wellness
Hello Families of Springbrook Elementary:
The students are currently learning Personal Hygiene and Body systems. Please Help us to reinforce that “Feeling clean can increase Self-Esteem”.
Also, please check Friday backpacks for important information about the 5210 Program.
5210 is a program promoting a healthy lifestyle for everyone. Please take a few minutes to view this introduction to the program.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21s8-SMOSTY#
Begin with small changes for a healthy body and mind!
Thank you for helping keeping our students safe and healthy.
Kimberly Plante,
School Nurse Teacher
October update
Hello Springbrook Families:
The start of the school year health classes are Playground Safety and Bucket Filling. Please talk with your child and ask them to share material about being Bucket Filler (Being nice to others) and being safe on the playground.
My goal is to keep our students as healthy as possible this school year. Our next lesson in Health is the single most important way to prevent the spread of germs, handwashing. Also, upcoming topics will include body hygiene and body systems, nutrition and dental hygiene. Please try to reinforce these topics at home by reviewing their health packets.
Announcements


Hello:
The annual Hearing screen for grades K-3 by the Rhode Island School of the Deaf will be on 9/19/16. This is a Rhode Island school Regulation. It is quick and easy and informative. If your child has a problem, you will be notified.

Springbrook Flu Clinic is on Tuesday, October 11 from 4-6 pm. Clinic is for ages 3 and up.
Although insurance information will be collected, there is no out of pocket cost for ANYONE regardless of whether or not they have health insurance.

Welcome Back!
Hello Springbrook families.

I hope everyone enjoyed their summer. It is time to start thinking about our first days of school.
Please contact me with any new health/allergy/medication information for your child. I will be in school starting in the afternoon on September 1, 2016. Also please see the link below on head lice. I look forward to a happy, healthy school year.
http://www.health.ri.gov/publications/protocols/HeadLice.pdf.



image
End of Year Greetings From your School Nurse
Students Who Have Medication at School
Students who have prescription medication at school need to have a parent pick them up on the last day of school.
If your child is allowed to carry their inhaler or Epi Pen, they can carry them home in their backpack. Please look in their backpacks for them when they get home.
If you have any questions, please email or call me.
Thank You
Kim Plante, RN, SNT
348-2306
As the hot days approach we should think about Sun Smarts: Too much sun and high temperatures can be unhealthy. We should all be able to enjoy our favorite summer fun activities if we just follow some simple tips.

· Seek shade. UV rays are strongest and most harmful during midday, so it's best to plan indoor activities then. If this is not possible, seek shade under a tree, an umbrella, or a pop-up tent. Use these options to prevent sunburn, not to seek relief after it's happened.
· Cover up. Clothing that covers your child's skin helps protect against UV rays. Although a long-sleeved shirt and long pants with a tight weave are best, they aren't always practical. A T-shirt, long shorts, or a beach cover-up are good choices, too.
· Get a hat. Hats that shade the face, scalp, ears, and neck are easy to use and give great protection. Baseball caps are popular among kids, but they don't protect their ears and neck. If your child chooses a cap, be sure to protect exposed areas with sunscreen.
· Carry a water bottle to prevent dehydration Children are at higher risk of dehydration because their bodies use more water.
· Apply sunscreen. Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and UVA and UVB protection every time your child goes outside and reapply after your child swims or exercises. Please remember to apply sunscreen to your child before school as we will be enjoying more outdoor activities.

We will continue to cover safety in health classes.
Enjoy a safe, healthy and happy summer!
Kimberly Plante,
School Nurse Teacher


Staying Well
This month in health class we will be studying the topic of staying well which is important because we need to protect our immune system (helps prevent disease). In order to do this we need to go back to the basics.
  1. Get plenty of sleep. According to CDC (Center for Disease Control), Insufficient sleep has been linked to the development and management of a number of chronic diseases and conditions, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and depression.
Sleep guidelines from the CDC
Age Recommended Amount of Sleep
Newborns 16–18 hours a day
Preschool-aged children 11–12 hours a day
School-aged children At least 10 hours a day
Teens 9–10 hours a day
Adults (including the elderly) 7–8 hours a day
  1. Eat a healthful diet- Just to reinforce, we should refer to the “Choose MyPlate.gov” website to help reinforce good eating habits, such as making half our plate’s fruits and vegetables and the other half whole grains and protein. Also, to drink plenty of water and avoid sugary beverages.
  2. Exercise regularly - Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and fitness, and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. School aged children should be getting at least 60 minutes of aerobic exercise daily.
  3. Preventing the spread of Germs- Washing hands is the number one preventive measure we can take to prevent spreading germs. We should also be conscious of sneezing or coughing into our elbow.
January Update
Hello:
We are currently studying Nutrition in health class. We will teach the four food groups as recommended by the government website ChooseMyPlate.gov. Please help to reinforce the importance of Energy in (the nutritious food we eat for the calories and energy we need to stay healthy) and Energy out (the activities and exercise we do to burn energy and calories).
Try some of these fun family activities for great indoor exercise when you can’t get outside.
-Organized dance or aerobic routines (possibly videos, Wii, Xbox)
-Freeze Dance – When the music stops, freeze in your pose and hold it until the music starts again.
-Hoola Hoop
-Follow the Leader - Add to the workout by doing energetic movements like jumping jacks, stomping and squatting.
Remember to drink plenty of water.
Kimberly Plante, SNT


Handwashing Lesson
Welcome back Springbrook Families:
My goal is to keep our students as healthy as possible this school year. Our first lesson in Health is the single most important way to prevent the spread of germs. Please try to reinforce the following steps at home:
Henry the Hand washer says follow these 5 steps:
  1. Wet hands
  2. Soap up
  3. Scrub up (for 20 seconds, sing to your favorite song)
  4. Rinse off
  5. Dry off
The most important times to wash hands are:
Before eating
After using the bathroom
After coughing
After Sneezing.
If you don’t have tissue available, sneeze or cough into your elbow.
Flu Clinics 2015/2016
Communities in Rhode Island are once again hosting free flu vaccination clinics. Click here to see all the clinics being offered in the state. The list is organized alphabetically, so you can find school or community locations that are convenient for you. Click on the register link on that page to register for the specific clinic you plan to attend. Clinic dates at Westerly Public School are as follows:
October 7, 2015 from 3:15-6:00 p.m.
October 22, 2015 from 3:30-6:00 p.m.
November 12, 2015 from 4:00-6:00 p.m.
October 20, 2015 from 3:30-6:00 p.m.
October 16, 2015 from 6:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
September 28, 2015 from 2:30-6:00 p.m.

School flu vaccination clinics are organized for students in kindergarten through grade 12. There is no out-of-pocket charge to be vaccinated. Insurance information will be collected from people who are insured. However, no one will be turned away for a lack of insurance.

Clinics for high school students are during the school day. Clinics for younger children are in the evening. Most evening clinics are open to family and community members.
A letter from your School Nurse Teacher
A letter from your School Nurse Teacher – School Year 2015/2016
Dear Parents,
Your School Nurse Teacher has come up with some helpful guidelines that help you to know whether your child should stay home from school; the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests answering these three quick questions:
  • Does your child have a fever?
  • Is your child well enough to engage in class?
  • Do you think your child is contagious (such as pinkeye or strep throat)
So when should I keep them home? A general guide is helpful, although when in question, or if your child has not seen his/her doctor, please call your SCHOOL NURSE.
Fever is the body's way of destroying the germs making it sick, and it's a common symptom of infections such as flu. Keep your children home if their temperature is 101° F or higher. Wait until children are fever-free without Tylenol or Motrin before letting them return to school.
Diarrhea is often the result of infection, food poisoning, or a side effect to medications like antibiotics. Keep children home until stools are formed and your doctor gives the okay. Make sure your sick child stays well-hydrated.
Vomiting is another way for the body to rid itself of the germs making it sick, and is usually caused by a stomach virus or stomach infection. Keep children home if they've vomited twice or more in the last 24 hours. They can return to school after symptoms clear up or your doctor says they're no longer contagious.
Mild cold or respiratory symptoms are no reason to keep children at home so long as their nasal drainage is clear and their cough is mild. Severe cough and cold symptoms should keep kids home from school. A serious cough could be a sign of contagious conditions like whooping cough, viral bronchitis, or croup. It can also be a sign of asthma or allergies. If the cough is mild, you may send in cough drops with a note to the nurse. If they have an inhaler, a doctor’s order must accompany the inhaler to school.
Sore throats can be a symptom of strep or a common cold. If your child has been diagnosed with strep throat, keep your child at home for at least 24 hours after starting antibiotics. If your child has a mild cold, it's okay to go to school.
Pinkeye (conjunctivitis) is contagious, and children should stay home from school for the first 24 hours after treatment begins. Symptoms of pinkeye include eye redness, irritation, swelling, and pus. If your child wakes up and their eye is crusted over, please consult his/her doctor.
Headaches Opinions differ on whether a child should be kept home. If your child doesn't have any other signs of illness, and feels okay, your child can go to school.
Rashes can be the sign of contagious conditions such as chickenpox or impetigo. If the rash is itchy, has drainage or is widespread over the body, they should be kept home until they're diagnosed. They can return to school after symptoms are gone or if their doctor gives the okay.
Earaches aren't contagious. There's no need to keep a child with a mild earache home, as long as your child feels well enough to concentrate.
Head lice verses Nits (Lice are live bugs and nits are tiny teardrop shaped eggs) In all cases the parent of the identified student will be notified when a case of nits +/or lice is found. Active head lice cases require communication with the parent. Treatment is required before returning to school. Good home to school communication is key.
Be well! Please call your School Nurse Teacher with any questions.
Springbrook 348-2306 Bradford 348-2287 Dunn’s Corners 315-2642
State Street 348-2344 WMS 315-1659 WHS 315-1599
Kindergarten Immunization Checklist
The following is a checklist for parents of incoming Grade K students:
  1. Physical Exam done within the last 12 months.
  2. Lead Test
  3. Vision exam (done by physician)
  4. DTAP immunization (5 doses)
  5. Polio immunization (4 doses)
  6. Hepatitis B immunization (3 doses)
  7. MMR immunization (2 doses)
  8. Varicella immunization (2 doses) or written proof prom physician that your child has had chickenpox
If your child is exempt from immunizations, please see me to sign a medical/religious exemption form.
Thank You
Sun Safety

Be Sun Smart

As the hot days approach we should think about Sun Smarts: Too much sun and high temperatures can be unhealthy. We should all be able to enjoy our favorite summer fun activities if we just follow some simple tips.

· Seek shade. UV rays are strongest and most harmful during midday, so it's best to plan indoor activities then. If this is not possible, seek shade under a tree, an umbrella, or a pop-up tent. Use these options to prevent sunburn, not to seek relief after it's happened.
· Cover up. Clothing that covers your child's skin helps protect against UV rays. Although a long-sleeved shirt and long pants with a tight weave are best, they aren't always practical. A T-shirt, long shorts, or a beach cover-up are good choices, too.
· Get a hat. Hats that shade the face, scalp, ears, and neck are easy to use and give great protection. Baseball caps are popular among kids, but they don't protect their ears and neck. If your child chooses a cap, be sure to protect exposed areas with sunscreen.
· Wear sunglasses. They protect your child's eyes from UV rays, which can lead to cataracts later in life. Look for sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.
· Apply sunscreen. Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and UVA and UVB protection every time your child goes outside. For the best protection, apply sunscreen generously 30 minutes before going outdoors. Don't forget to protect ears, noses, lips, and the tops of feet. Take sunscreen with you to reapply during the day, especially after your child swims or exercises. This applies to waterproof and water-resistant products as well.

Don’t forget to hydrate!
Children are at a higher risk of dehydration because their bodies use more water.
Signs of mild to moderate dehydration:
  • Thirst
  • Dry or sticky mouth
  • Not urinating much
  • Darker yellow urine
  • Dry, cool skin
  • Headache
  • Muscle cramps
Prevention
  • Drink plenty of fluids every day. Drink more when the weather is hot or you are exercising.
  • If you think you or someone in your family may become dehydrated, call your health care provider. Do this before the person becomes dehydrated.
Enjoy a safe, healthy and happy summer!
Kimberly Plante,
School Nurse Teacher


This Month's Health lessons
From the school nurse:

Health class this month is focusing on Emotional Health and Safety. Issues such as home/car and outdoor safety are being addressed with grades K, 1, 2 and safety around strangers is discussed with grades 3 and 4. The focus is not to be afraid but be Aware of your surroundings. Also, Substance abuse is touched upon with all grades. The main focus is never to touch medicines. Only the adult in your life can administer it and substances such as alcohol, caffeine, nicotine and street drugs are dangerous and students are encouraged to say NO if they ever come their way.
Please feel free to ask them what they have learned and continue to reinforce. Increasing self-esteem is a great way to decrease the chances of a child making the wrong decisions.
Dental Screening
Hello everyone. This month in health class the students are learning about dental health which will coincide with our annual dental screening by Dr. Shannon on February 24th. This is an opportunity to spend some time to encourage the children to practice their brushing and flossing skills. A great way to explain dental health to children is to tell them that healthy teeth are part of a healthy body and a shiny, beautiful smile makes others smile back. Also by flossing we are making sure our gums are healthy too. If we do not floss, foods like gooey sweets and popcorn kernels could get stuck in our gums that we could not reach with brushing. This could cause cavities and gum infections. An interactive way to practice flossing with your child is to make a fist while they run the floss through your knuckles. Also, when brushing, don’t forget to brush your tongue for a fresh, clean mouth every day.
If your child seems apprehensive about seeing the dentist you can assure him/her that he will only be looking in their mouth and not doing any dental work.
Kimberly Plante, School Nurse Teacher
Head Lice
Also with winter come an increase of incidences of head lice. Head lice are a common community problem. They are wingless insects that live close to the human scalp. Lice move by crawling and cannot jump or fly. They are spread by direct head-to- head contact; usually during slumber parties, sharing hats, scarves and personal items such as combs, brushes and headbands.
Winter
The winter season is upon us and I would like to send out a reminder to please send your child to school dressed for the wintery weather. Hats and gloves and a warm coat are ideal. Generally, the children will be going out for recess unless the weather/temperature and or playground conditions do not warrant it.
Health Class
I would like to mention that we have been studying the human body in health class and will be starting with dental health soon. I encourage families to review student’s papers they take home for reinforcement of their health lessons.

Thanks
Kimberly Plante,
School Nurse Teacher
Files
 medication_form[1].pdf
Medication Form
 Physical.pdf
Physical Form
 school attendance guidelines.docx
A letter from your School Nurse Teacher -Winter 2015
Contacts
+ Plante, Kimberly
Click on name to see details.
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